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What the dominant society can't give me: Perceptions of Native American elders teaching native traditions

TitleWhat the dominant society can't give me: Perceptions of Native American elders teaching native traditions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsDrywater-Whitekiller, V
JournalThe Journal of Baccalaureate Social WorkThe Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work
Volume12
Pagination71-86
Date PublishedFal
ISBN Number1084-7219
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2007-17810-005
Keywords*American Indians, *College Students, *Intergenerational Relations, *Student Attitudes, *Traditions, Classroom Dynamics & Student Adjustment & Attitudes [3560], Culture & Ethnology [2930], dominant society, Native American elders, teaching native traditions, Native American college students, intergenerational culture, Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs) Thirties (30-39 yrs) Middle Age (40-64 yrs), Society, us
AbstractAn area of concern in using elders in Native American prevention and treatment programs is that many younger tribal members no longer respect and seek out elders to learn the traditions. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the process of enculturation via the teachings of Native elders through the perceptions of Native American college students. A total of nineteen Native American students were interviewed in their last year of undergraduate studies. The methods of data collection included primary data collection in the form of one-on-one extended, structured interviews composed of open-ended questions. The results indicated Native grandparents were viewed by these participants as being a vital connection to Native traditions and identity. Comparative research can explore the perceptions of Native grandparents in their motivations to teach traditions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
Ethno Med: