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Understanding Hmong women's beliefs, feelings, norms, and external conditions about breast and cervical cancer screening

TitleUnderstanding Hmong women's beliefs, feelings, norms, and external conditions about breast and cervical cancer screening
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLor, M, Khang, PY, Xiong, P, Moua, KF, Lauver, D
JournalPublic Health NursPublic Health Nurs
Volume30
Pagination420-8
Date PublishedSep-Oct
ISBN Number1525-1446 (Electronic)<br/>0737-1209 (Linking)
Accession Number24000914
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group/ psychology/statistics & numerical data, Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis/ ethnology, Cultural Characteristics, Early Detection of Cancer/ utilization, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ ethnology, Humans, Middle Aged, Psychological Theory, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis/ ethnology, Young Adult
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the beliefs, feelings, norms, and external conditions regarding breast and cervical cancer screening in a sample of Hmong women. DESIGN AND SAMPLE: In a descriptive design, female Hmong researchers recruited 16 Hmong women (ages 24-73) at a community center. Guided by the Theory of Care Seeking Behavior (TCSB), researchers asked participants semi-structured questions about their beliefs, feelings, norms, and external conditions in a group setting. Researchers documented responses in writing and audio recordings. Guided by theory, we used directed content analysis to categorize responses. RESULTS: Participants' beliefs' about screening included uncertainty about causes of breast and cervical cancer, uncertainty about Western forms of treatments, and terminal illness as outcomes of such cancer. Many felt embarrassed about breast and cervical cancer screening. Their cultural norms about undressing for an exam and listening to authority figures were different from Western norms. External conditions that influenced participants' for screenings included difficulties in communicating with interpreters and clinicians. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the TCSB, Hmong women's beliefs, affect, cultural norms and external conditions helped to understand their use of breast and cervical screening. Findings could guide nursing and public health interventions to improve culturally sensitive, cancer screening for Hmong women.
Ethno Med: