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Strategies to Recruit and Retain Older Filipino-American Immigrants for a Cancer Screening Study

TitleStrategies to Recruit and Retain Older Filipino-American Immigrants for a Cancer Screening Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsMaxwell, AE, Bastani, R, Vida, P, Warda, US
JournalJournal of Community Health: The Publication for Health Promotion and Disease PreventionJournal of Community Health: The Publication for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Volume30
Pagination167-179
Date PublishedJun
ISBN Number0094-5145<br/>1573-3610
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2005-04184-001
Keywords*Cancer Screening, *Experimental Subjects, *Immigration, *Minority Groups, Cancer [3293], Filipino American immigrants, cancer screening, recruitment strategies, minority groups, retention strategies, Human Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older), Research Methods & Experimental Design [2260], Strategies, us
AbstractRecruitment and retention of subjects in cancer prevention, screening, and treatment trials is challenging, especially if subjects are low-income, from minority groups, or immigrants with limited English fluency. This article describes our experiences in recruiting 530 female Filipino-American immigrants with community-based organizations and churches for a randomized trial that assessed the effect of a small group educational session on breast and cervical cancer screening. We found that a personal invitation from either a female project liaison, a friend, or the Filipino project director were all successful strategies that resulted in over 80% attendance at an educational session that was offered as part of the study. Although non-attendees did not differ from attendees in demographic characteristics, they expressed significantly more barriers to participating in a health study. Attendance at the group session was a significant predictor of retention in the study. We were able to conduct telephone follow-up surveys among 88% of enrollees at 12 month follow-up and 76% at 24 month follow-up. Results and implications are discussed in the hope that they may facilitate future participation of Filipinos and other Asian immigrants in research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
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