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Social determinants of smoking among Hmong Americans residing in Wisconsin

TitleSocial determinants of smoking among Hmong Americans residing in Wisconsin
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsRooney, BL, Choudhary, R, Bliss, A
JournalWMJWMJ
Volume108
Pagination439-46
Date PublishedDec
ISBN Number1098-1861 (Print)<br/>1098-1861 (Linking)
Accession Number20131685
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Asia, Southeastern/ethnology, Asian Americans/ statistics & numerical data, Child, Female, Focus Groups, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Questionnaires, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking/ epidemiology/ ethnology, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors, Wisconsin/epidemiology
AbstractOBJECTIVE: This study examined correlates of tobacco use among Hmong people residing in Wisconsin. METHODS: Surveys of youth (ages 12-17) and adults (ages > or =18), available in English and Hmong, were distributed in 14 communities through Hmong Mutual Assistance Associations and analyzed centrally. Surveys assessed daily and ever use of tobacco, as well as other sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: Of those contacted, 2856 people completed the survey (1460 youth and 1396 adults). Among youth, 15% reported daily use (18.8% for males, 11.7% for females); 32% reported ever use (36.3% for males, 28.2% for females). Education and birth location were significant predictors of tobacco use. Youth who reported someone in their household smoked were more likely to use tobacco. The odds of ever use of tobacco increased as the percent of life lived in the United States increased (OR = 3.7). Among adults, prevalence of daily use was 20% (25.3% for males, 12.4% for females) and ever use was 35.9% (45% for males, 23.2% for females.) Adults born in the United States were 3.4 to 3.7 times more likely to use tobacco. The less education reported, the more likely they were to be a daily tobacco user. Adults who reported that someone in their household smoked were 2.8 to 3.4 times more likely to use tobacco. CONCLUSION: Overall, Hmong males are at higher risk of smoking than females, although this difference is smaller for youth than adults. Education and household exposure are strong predictors of smoking prevalence.
Ethno Med: