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Smoking cessation and its determinants among older American Indians: the Strong Heart Study

TitleSmoking cessation and its determinants among older American Indians: the Strong Heart Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsHenderson, PN, Rhoades, D, Henderson, JA, Welty, TK, Buchwald, D
JournalEthn DisEthn Dis
Volume14
Pagination274-9
Date PublishedSpring
ISBN Number1049-510X (Print)<br/>1049-510X (Linking)
Accession Number15132214
KeywordsAdult, Age Distribution, Aged, Arizona/epidemiology, Cardiovascular Diseases/ethnology/ prevention & control, Female, Health Behavior/ ethnology, Humans, Indians, North American/ psychology, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Midwestern United States/epidemiology, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Smoking Cessation/ ethnology, Socioeconomic Factors
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between sociodemographic, clinical, and smoking history factors, and smoking cessation among older American Indians. DESIGN: Nested cohort study of cigarette smokers in the Strong Heart Study, a longitudinal study of cardiovascular disease among American Indians. SETTING: Thirteen American Indian tribes from Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota. PARTICIPANTS: American Indian men and women (N = 998), aged 45-74 years, who identified themselves as smokers at the initial Strong Heart Study examination. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-one percent of smokers quit during the 4-year follow-up period. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between baseline sociodemographic, clinical, and smoking history factors, and smoking cessation. Factors associated with smoking cessation included being 65-74 years old (odds ratio [OR] 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 3.3), being examined at the Arizona regional center (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.3, 3.7), being non-daily smokers (OR 5.4; 95% CI 1.3, 18.5), smoking fewer than 6 cigarettes daily (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.3, 4.7), being a smoker for fewer years(OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.0, 3.9), beginning to smoke at an older age (17 years or older, OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1, 2.4), and having a history of diabetes (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2, 2.3). Factors not associated with smoking cessation included gender, level of education, childhood exposure to tobacco smoking, and a history of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, or respiratory diseases. CONCLUSION: Several determinants of smoking cessation among older American Indians identified in this study may have important implications for designing appropriate interventions for this special population.
Ethno Med: