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The role of Hawaiian elders in substance abuse treatment among Asian/Pacific Islander women... co-published simultaneously in Journal of Family Social Work (The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol 4, No. 4, 2000, pp. 33-44; and: Substance Abuse Issues Among Families

TitleThe role of Hawaiian elders in substance abuse treatment among Asian/Pacific Islander women... co-published simultaneously in Journal of Family Social Work (The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol 4, No. 4, 2000, pp. 33-44; and: Substance Abuse Issues Among Families
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsFong, R
JournalJournal of Family Social WorkJournal of Family Social Work
Volume4
Pagination33-44
ISBN Number1052-2158
KeywordsAdult, Asians -- Hawaii, Female, Grounded Theory, Hawaii, Human, Pregnancy, Qualitative Studies, Semi-Structured Interview, Substance Use Rehabilitation Programs -- Trends -- Hawaii, Support, Psychosocial, Women's Health Services -- Trends -- Hawaii
AbstractThe elders of a culture are often the designated transmitters of long-standing values and ways that define the unique essence of a people. Kupuna (elders) teachings are especially important to Native Hawaiians who have experienced the cumulative effects of cultural imperialism, which has taken their lands, discouraged use of their language and cultural ways, damaged their identity as a people and destroyed their sovereignty.
Modern day cultural imperialism, which universalizes the dominant group's experience and culture, renders minority groups as invisible while marginalizing them (Young, 1990). The chronic stress of this insidious form of oppression can translate into physical, mental health problems which lead to decreased life expectancy (McEwen, 1998; Schulkin, Gold & McEwen, 1998). Statistics on Hawaiians and other Asian/Pacific Islanders in Hawai'i indicate these groups have high rates of health problems and increasing rates of substance abuse (Office of Hawaiian Affairs, 1998).