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The relation between acculturation and alcohol consumption patterns among older Asian and Hispanic immigrants

TitleThe relation between acculturation and alcohol consumption patterns among older Asian and Hispanic immigrants
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsBryant, AN, Kim, G
JournalAging Ment HealthAging Ment Health
Volume17
Pagination147-56
ISBN Number1364-6915 (Electronic)<br/>1360-7863 (Linking)
Accession Number23098103
KeywordsAcculturation, Aged, Alcohol Drinking/ethnology/psychology, Alcoholic Beverages/classification/statistics & numerical data, Asian Continental Ancestry Group/psychology/statistics & numerical data, Binge Drinking/ethnology/psychology, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Culture, Demography, Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology/statistics & numerical data, Female, Hispanic Americans/psychology/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Risk Factors, Self Report, Socioeconomic Factors, United States/epidemiology
AbstractThis study examines the relation between acculturation and alcohol consumption patterns among older Asian and Hispanic immigrants in the state of California. Data were obtained from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey and included Asian (n = 1264) and Hispanic (n = 571) adults aged 60 and older who were born outside of the US. Outcome variables included presence of past year alcohol consumption, past year binge drinking, and number of binge drinking days. Acculturation was measured with items pertaining to English use and proficiency. Hierarchical multiple or logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each racial/ethnic group and each dependent variable. Alcohol consumption was found in less than half of the sample for both Asians (43.2%) and Hispanics (39.2%). Binge drinking was found in 3.1% of Asians and 8.4% of Hispanics. Acculturation was significantly related to past year alcohol consumption for Hispanics, past year binge drinking for Asians, and binge drinking days for Asians, such that higher level of acculturation predicted a greater likelihood of alcohol consumption but decreased likelihood of binge drinking and fewer binge drinking days. The results indicate that acculturation may be related to alcohol consumption patterns for older immigrants. This suggests future needs to develop an in-depth understanding of the health behaviors of these immigrant elderly groups.