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Racial discrimination and racial identity attitudes in relation to self-rated health and physical pain and impairment among two-spirit American Indians/Alaska Natives

TitleRacial discrimination and racial identity attitudes in relation to self-rated health and physical pain and impairment among two-spirit American Indians/Alaska Natives
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsChae, DH, Walters, KL
JournalAm J Public HealthAm J Public Health
Volume99 Suppl 1
PaginationS144-51
Date PublishedApr
ISBN Number1541-0048 (Electronic)<br/>0090-0036 (Linking)
Accession Number19218182
KeywordsAdaptation, Psychological, Alaska/epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Indians, North American/ statistics & numerical data, Inuits/ statistics & numerical data, Logistic Models, Pain/epidemiology/ ethnology, Prejudice, Prevalence, Psychometrics, Risk Factors, Social Identification, Washington/epidemiology
AbstractOBJECTIVES: We examined associations between racial discrimination and actualization, defined as the degree of positive integration between self-identity and racial group identity, and self-rated health and physical pain and impairment. METHODS: We used logistic regressions to analyze data from 447 gay, lesbian, bisexual, and other sexual-minority American Indians/Alaska Natives. RESULTS: Greater self-reported discrimination was associated with higher odds of physical pain and impairment (odds ratio [OR] = 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.13, 1.78); high levels of actualization were associated with lower odds of physical pain and impairment (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.35, 0.99) and self-rated fair or poor health (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.90). Actualization also moderated the influence of discrimination on self-rated health (t = -2.33; P = .020). Discrimination was positively associated with fair or poor health among participants with low levels of actualization, but this association was weak among those with high levels of actualization. CONCLUSIONS: Among two-spirit American Indians/Alaska Natives, discrimination may be a risk factor for physical pain and impairment and for fair or poor self-rated health among those with low levels of actualization. Actualization may protect against physical pain and impairment and poor self-rated health and buffer the negative influence of discrimination.
Ethno Med: