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The prevalence of suicide attempts among community-dwelling US Chinese older adults-Findings from the PINE study

TitleThe prevalence of suicide attempts among community-dwelling US Chinese older adults-Findings from the PINE study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsDong, XQ, Chen, R, E. Chang, S, Simon, MA
JournalEthnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CareEthnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care
Volume7
Pagination23-35
ISBN Number1757-0980<br/>2042-8367
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2014-20836-003
Keywords*Aging, *Chinese Cultural Groups, *Epidemiology, *Suicide, Attempted Suicide, Behavior Disorders & Antisocial Behavior [3230], Community Services, Experimentation, Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older), suicide attempts, community-dwelling, older adults, epidemiological study, us
AbstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of suicide attempts and explore the suicide methods among community-dwelling Chinese older adults. Design/methodology/approach - Data were drawn from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE) study, a population-based epidemiological study of Chinese older adults aged 60 years and above in the greater Chicago area. Guided by the community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, the study enrolled 3,159 community-dwelling Chinese older adults from 2011 to 2013. Findings - The lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts is 791 per 100,000 and the past 12-month prevalence of suicide attempts is 285 per 100,000. Medication overdose is the most common suicide method both in the group of lifetime suicide attempts and 12-month suicide attempts. Lower income is positively correlated with lifetime suicide attempts and 12-month suicide attempts. Living with fewer household members is positively correlated with lifetime suicide attempts but not with 12-month suicide attempts. Research limitations/implications - The findings emphasize the needs for improved understanding of suicidal behavior among minority older adults and to develop culturally and linguistically sensitive prevention and intervention strategies. Practical implications - Community stakeholders should improve the accessibility and availability of culturally sensitive mental health services and extend timely and effective suicide interventions in the Chinese community. Originality/value - This study represents the first and largest population-based epidemiological study to investigate the suicide attempts and methods among US Chinese older adults. In addition, the implementation of the CBPR approach allows us to minimize the cultural barriers associated with suicide investigation. The study emphasizes the need for improved understanding on suicidal behavior among minority older adults to inform culturally and linguistically sensitive prevention and intervention strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
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