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Prevalence and incidence trends for diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 20 to 79 years, United States, 1980-2012

TitlePrevalence and incidence trends for diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 20 to 79 years, United States, 1980-2012
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsGeiss, LS, Wang, J, Cheng, YJ, Thompson, TJ, Barker, L, Li, Y, Albright, AL, Gregg, EW
JournalJAMAJAMA
Volume312
Pagination1218-26
Date PublishedSep 24
ISBN Number1538-3598 (Electronic)<br/>0098-7484 (Linking)
Accession Number25247518
KeywordsAdult, African Americans/statistics & numerical data, Aged, Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis/ epidemiology/ethnology, European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, United States
AbstractIMPORTANCE: Although the prevalence and incidence of diabetes have increased in the United States in recent decades, no studies have systematically examined long-term, national trends in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To examine long-term trends in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes to determine whether there have been periods of acceleration or deceleration in rates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We analyzed 1980-2012 data for 664,969 adults aged 20 to 79 years from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to estimate incidence and prevalence rates for the overall civilian, noninstitutionalized, US population and by demographic subgroups (age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational level). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The annual percentage change (APC) in rates of the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes (type 1 and type 2 combined). RESULTS: The APC for age-adjusted prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes did not change significantly during the 1980s (for prevalence, 0.2% [95% CI, -0.9% to 1.4%], P = .69; for incidence, -0.1% [95% CI, -2.5% to 2.4%], P = .93), but each increased sharply during 1990-2008 (for prevalence, 4.5% [95% CI, 4.1% to 4.9%], P