Skip to content Skip to navigation

Perceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans

TitlePerceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsWooten, KG, Wortley, PM, Singleton, JA, Euler, GL
JournalVaccineVaccine
Volume30
Pagination6927-34
Date PublishedNov 6
ISBN Number1873-2518 (Electronic)<br/>0264-410X (Linking)
Accession Number22939908
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Influenza Vaccines/ administration & dosage/adverse effects/ immunology, Influenza, Human/ prevention & control, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, United States, Vaccination/adverse effects/ utilization
AbstractBACKGROUND: Knowledge and beliefs about influenza vaccine that differ across racial or ethnic groups may promote racial or ethnic disparities in vaccination. OBJECTIVE: To identify associations between vaccination behavior and personal beliefs about influenza vaccine by race or ethnicity and education levels among the U.S. elderly population. METHODS: Data from a national telephone survey conducted in 2004 were used for this study. Responses for 3875 adults >/= 65 years of age were analyzed using logistic regression methods. RESULTS: Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs were observed. For example, whites were more likely to believe influenza vaccine is very effective in preventing influenza compared to blacks and Hispanics (whites, 60%; blacks, 47%, and Hispanics, 51%, p
Ethno Med: