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Perceptions of family involvement and quality of life among older African Americans with mental disorders

TitlePerceptions of family involvement and quality of life among older African Americans with mental disorders
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsPeterson, TLeigh Doth
UniversityPeterson, Tina Leigh Dothard: U Alabama, US
Accession NumberDissertation Abstract: 2011-99200-475
Keywords*Blacks, *Family, *Involvement, *Mental Disorders, *Quality of Life, Human Male Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older), Life Satisfaction, Perception, perceptions, family involvement, quality of life, older African Americans, mental disorders, Social Psychology [3000], us
AbstractThis study used secondary data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL) to examine factors that impact general happiness and life satisfaction. The sample consisted of 168 African Americans aged 55 to 74 with at least one lifetime mental disorder. The conceptual model consisted of 13 independent variables. Perceived control was included as a mediating variable. The dependent variables were life satisfaction and general happiness. In bivariate analyses, 8 of 13 variables were significantly related to life satisfaction and general happiness. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) found statistically significant differences between education on general happiness [F(3, 163)=2.78, p=.04]. In the two-way ANOVAs, gender and education emerged as significant for general happiness alone. There was a statistically significant main effect for gender [ F(1,164)=5.02, p=.03] but not marital status. When controlling for gender, the main effect for education [F(3, 159)=2.77, p=.04] was statistically significant. Additionally, there was a significant main effect for education F(3, 160)=3.21, p=.03] but not marital status. Overall, older African American males with lifetime mental disorders with less than a high school education reported more general happiness. In the regression models, depressive symptoms were the strongest predictor of higher life satisfaction and general happiness scores. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer depressive symptoms and higher importance of religion scores. Moreover, higher general happiness scores were significant with higher perceived income adequacy and fewer depressive symptoms. In the general linear model, statistically significant multivariates were gender, physical health, depressive symptoms, and positive family interaction. Univariately, general happiness scores were significantly associated with self-rated physical health, depressive symptoms, frequency of family contact, negative family interaction, and education. Life satisfaction scores were significant with self-rated physical health, depressive symptoms, and negative family interaction. Overall, the univariate models explained 13% (adjusted R squared) of variance in life satisfaction scores and 21% (adjusted R squared) of variance in general happiness scores. Perceived control fully mediated the relationship between the predictors of family involvement and general happiness. In conclusion, the findings suggest a combination of variables impact general happiness and life satisfaction among older African Americans with lifetime mental disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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