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Perceived problems with access to medical care and depression among older Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, other Hispanics, and a comparison group of non-Hispanic Whites

TitlePerceived problems with access to medical care and depression among older Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, other Hispanics, and a comparison group of non-Hispanic Whites
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsRodriguez-Galan, MB, Falcon, LM
JournalJ Aging HealthJ Aging Health
Volume21
Pagination501-18
Date PublishedJun
ISBN Number0898-2643 (Print)<br/>0898-2643 (Linking)
Accession Number19318608
KeywordsAcculturation, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Depression/ ethnology, Depressive Disorder/ ethnology, Dominican Republic/ethnology, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Services Accessibility, Health Status, Hispanic Americans/ ethnology, Humans, Male, Massachusetts, Middle Aged, Puerto Rico/ethnology, Socioeconomic Factors
AbstractThe relationship between problems accessing medical care and depression is examined in a sample of older Hispanics (Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Other Hispanic) in Massachusetts and a comparison group of same-neighborhood non-Hispanic Whites. The research questions are: Do older Hispanics experience more problems with access to medical care than do older non-Hispanic Whites? What types of access problems do Hispanics encounter, and how do these relate to depression symptoms? The data come from the Massachusetts Hispanic Elders Study; descriptive and multivariate regression analysis procedures are used. Older Hispanics report more problems obtaining medical care than do older non-Hispanic Whites. Puerto Ricans report significantly more transportation problems to access medical care. For Dominicans and Puerto Ricans, being female, living alone, and lower education attainment are associated with depression. For Puerto Ricans, health problems, disability, and access problems are also significant.