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Older Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations: immigration and other factors associated with institutionalization

TitleOlder Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations: immigration and other factors associated with institutionalization
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsFuller-Thomson, E, Chi, M
JournalInt J Environ Res Public HealthInt J Environ Res Public Health
Volume9
Pagination3264-79
Date PublishedSep
ISBN Number1660-4601 (Electronic)<br/>1660-4601 (Linking)
Accession Number23202683
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Asian Americans, Cognition Disorders/ epidemiology/ethnology, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Health Status Disparities, Humans, institutionalization, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Nursing Homes, Oceanic Ancestry Group, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States/epidemiology
AbstractThis study determined the national prevalence and profile of Asian Americans with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations and identified factors associated with institutionalization. Data were obtained from 2006 American Community Survey, which replaced the long-form of the US Census. The data are nationally representative of both institutionalized and community-dwelling older adults. Respondents were Vietnamese (n = 203), Korean (n = 131), Japanese (n = 193), Filipino (n = 309), Asian Indian (n = 169), Chinese (n = 404), Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (n = 54), and non-Hispanic whites (n = 55,040) aged 55 and over who all had ADL limitations. The prevalence of institutionalized among those with ADL limitations varies substantially from 4.7% of Asian Indians to 18.8% of Korean Americans with ADL limitations. Every AAPI group had a lower prevalence of institutionalization than disabled Non-Hispanic whites older adults (23.8%) (p