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A longitudinal study of drinking and cognitive performance in elderly Japanese American men: The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study

TitleA longitudinal study of drinking and cognitive performance in elderly Japanese American men: The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsGalanis, DJ, Joseph, C, Masaki, KH, Petrovitch, H, Ross, G, White, L
JournalAmerican Journal of Public HealthAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume90
Pagination1254-1259
Date PublishedAug
ISBN Number0090-0036<br/>1541-0048
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2001-06657-005
Keywords*Aging, *Alcohol Drinking Patterns, *Cognitive Ability, alcohol consumption, cognitive performance, elderly males, aging, Cognitive Processes [2340], Human Male Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Aged (65 yrs & older) Very Old (85 yrs & older), Psychopharmacology [2580], us
AbstractExamined the relationship between alcohol consumption and cognitive performance in elderly males. In the prospective study 3,556 male Japanese-Americans (aged 71-93 yrs) were assessed for alcohol consumption during the period 1971-1974; cognitive performance was measured with the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CAST) at 18-yr follow-up. Results show a positive relationship between a history of Ss' moderate alcohol consumption and declining cognitive performance. The relationship between drinking and later cognitive performance was nonlinear, as nondrinkers and heavy drinkers obtained the lowest CAST scores and the highest risks of poor and intermediate CAST outcomes. Compared with nondrinkers, the risk of a poor CAST score was lowered by 22%-40% among Ss who consumed 1-60 ounces of alcohol per month. It is concluded that there is a positive association between moderate alcohol intake among middle-aged males and subsequent cognitive performance in later life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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