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Living Well with Living Wills: Application of Protection Motivation Theory to Living Wills Among Older Caucasian and African American Adults

TitleLiving Well with Living Wills: Application of Protection Motivation Theory to Living Wills Among Older Caucasian and African American Adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsAllen, RS, Phillips, LL, Pekmezi, D, Crowther, MR, Prentice-Dunn, S
JournalClin GerontolClin Gerontol
Volume32
Pagination44-59
Date PublishedJan 1
ISBN Number0731-7115 (Print)<br/>0731-7115 (Linking)
Accession Number19337566
AbstractUsing protection motivation theory, we examined racial differences in intent to complete a living will, rational problem solving (e.g., information seeking), and maladaptive coping responses (i.e., wishful thinking) to a health crisis. Sixty healthy, older adults without living wills responded to written vignettes, including information about living wills as an effective coping mechanism to avoid a health crisis. Use of adaptive coping responses predicted intent to execute a living will. A significant race-by-threat interaction predicted use of rational problem solving, with Caucasians more likely to seek information in response to perceived threat in comparison with African Americans. A significant race-by-adaptive-coping interaction predicted maladaptive coping, indicating that Caucasians were more variable in their maladaptive responses. The effectiveness of health care messages regarding living wills for older adults may be enhanced by focusing on racial differences in response to perceived health threat and perceived adaptive coping information.
Ethno Med: