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Kidney cancer incidence and mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990-2009

TitleKidney cancer incidence and mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990-2009
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLi, J, Weir, HK, Jim, MA, King, SM, Wilson, R, Master, VA
JournalAm J Public HealthAm J Public Health
Volume104 Suppl 3
PaginationS396-403
Date PublishedJun
ISBN Number1541-0048 (Electronic)<br/>0090-0036 (Linking)
Accession Number24754655
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Alaska/epidemiology/ethnology, Cause of Death, Death Certificates, European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data, Female, Humans, Incidence, Indians, North American/ statistics & numerical data, Inuits/ statistics & numerical data, Kidney Neoplasms/ epidemiology/ethnology/mortality, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Registries, United States/epidemiology
AbstractOBJECTIVES: We describe rates and trends in kidney cancer incidence and mortality and identify disparities between American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) and White populations. METHODS: To improve identification of AI/AN race, incidence and mortality data were linked with Indian Health Service (IHS) patient records. Analysis focused on residents of IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties; Hispanics were excluded. We calculated age-adjusted kidney cancer incidence (2001-2009) and death rates (1990-2009) by sex, age, and IHS region. RESULTS: AI/AN persons have a 1.6 times higher kidney cancer incidence and a 1.9 times higher kidney cancer death rate than Whites. Despite a significant decline in kidney cancer death rates for Whites (annual percentage change [APC] = -0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.5, 0.0), death rates for AI/AN persons remained stable (APC = 0.4; 95% CI = -0.7, 1.5). Kidney cancer incidence rates rose more rapidly for AI/AN persons (APC = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.2, 5.8) than for Whites (APC = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.4, 2.8). CONCLUSIONS: AI/AN individuals have greater risk of developing and dying of kidney cancers. Incidence rates have increased faster in AI/AN populations than in Whites. Death rates have decreased slightly in Whites but remained stable in AI/AN populations. Racial disparities in kidney cancer are widening.
Ethno Med: