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The influence of eastern philosophy on elder care by Chinese Americans: attitudes toward long-term care

TitleThe influence of eastern philosophy on elder care by Chinese Americans: attitudes toward long-term care
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSmith, CS, Hung, LC
JournalJ Transcult NursJ Transcult Nurs
Volume23
Pagination100-5
Date PublishedJan
ISBN Number1552-7832 (Electronic)<br/>1043-6596 (Linking)
Accession Number22228782
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Aging/ethnology/ psychology, Asian Americans/ethnology/ psychology, Buddhism/ psychology, China/ethnology, Confucianism/ psychology, Cultural Competency, Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology, Female, Geriatric Nursing, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Intergenerational Relations, Long-Term Care/ psychology, Male, Religious Philosophies/psychology, Taiwan/ethnology, United States
AbstractChinese philosophy has been a major cornerstone of Chinese culture for millennia and has bestowed on the world traditions such as Taoism, Yin and Yang, and filial piety. Although these beliefs have remained steadfast over thousands of years, their ability to survive unchanged in the future is uncertain. As the world forges ahead into the 21st century, several pertinent questions arise: Will age-old axioms, primarily those concerning elderly Chinese and their relationship with their children, survive? When ancient, traditional beliefs conflict with newer, Western ideas, which system of thought is likely to be the victor? Moreover, will elderly Chinese Americans and their perceptions concerning long-term care facilities cause problems with the traditional familial unit? This article will discuss these issues in detail.
Ethno Med: