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The influence of culture on the experiences of Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian-American family caregivers of frail older adults: a literature review

TitleThe influence of culture on the experiences of Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian-American family caregivers of frail older adults: a literature review
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsKong, EH
JournalTaehan Kanho Hakhoe ChiTaehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi
Volume37
Pagination213-20
Date PublishedMar
ISBN Number1598-2874 (Print)<br/>1598-2874 (Linking)
Accession Number17435406
KeywordsAdaptation, Psychological, Aged, Asian Americans, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Caregivers/psychology, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Decision Making, European Continental Ancestry Group, Frail Elderly, Humans, Korea/ethnology, Motivation, Social Support, United States
AbstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this review is to explore cultural influences on the experiences of Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American family caregivers caring for frail older adults in terms of the selection of a primary caregiver, caregiving motivation, support/help-seeking, and negative emotional responses(depression and burden). METHODS: Seven electronic databases were searched to retrieve studies from 1966 to 2005. Thirty-two studies were identified. RESULTS: This review supported cultural influences on the selection of primary caregiver, caregiving motivation, and support/help-seeking among the three caregiver groups. In Korean caregivers, the major primary caregivers were daughters-in-law while among Korean American and Caucasian American caregivers, the major primary caregivers were daughters or spouses. As a major caregiving motivation, Caucasian American caregivers reported filial affection while Korean caregivers and Korean American caregivers reported filial obligation. Korean caregivers reported higher extended family support, while Caucasian American caregivers reported higher utilization of formal support. Korean caregivers showed the highest levels of depression followed by Korean American caregivers and Caucasian American caregivers. CONCLUSION: In order to develop culturally appropriate interventions and policies, more research is needed to further explain these differences among the three groups, especially regarding support/help-seeking and negative emotional responses.
Ethno Med: