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Identifying the relationship between chronic pain, depression, and life satisfaction in older African Americans

TitleIdentifying the relationship between chronic pain, depression, and life satisfaction in older African Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsBaker, TA, Buchanan, NCT, Small, BJ, Hines, RD, Whitfield, KE
JournalResearch on AgingResearch on Aging
Volume33
Pagination426-443
Date PublishedJul
ISBN Number0164-0275
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2011-11093-005
Keywords*Chronic Pain, *Life Satisfaction, *Major Depression, *Psychosocial Factors, Blacks, chronic pain, depression, life satisfaction, older African Americans, psychosocial indicators, Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Aged (65 yrs & older), Physical & Somatoform & Psychogenic Disorders [3290], us
AbstractEmpirical research on the chronic pain experience of older African Americans is scarce. Here, the authors examined the influence psychosocial indicators have on the pain experience in a sample of older African Americans. Data were collected from African Americans (N = 247) 50 to 96 years of age (69.4 + 9.4). All participants provided self-report data on pain indicators, demographic characteristics, social (social support, locus of control, life satisfaction) variables, and depression. Those reporting higher levels of social support and depressive symptoms experienced greater pain intensity. Pain had an indirect effect on depression as mediated through life satisfaction. These findings demonstrate the need to focus more on the means to prevent and treat pain and to ameliorate its impact on social well-being, psychological functioning, and quality of life in older adults in general and older minority adults in particular. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
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