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Heightened risk of fire deaths among older African Americans and Native Americans

TitleHeightened risk of fire deaths among older African Americans and Native Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsBishai, D, Lee, S
JournalPublic Health RepPublic Health Rep
Volume125
Pagination406-13
Date PublishedMay-Jun
ISBN Number0033-3549 (Print)<br/>0033-3549 (Linking)
Accession Number20433035
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, African Americans/statistics & numerical data, Age Distribution, Aged, Burns/ethnology/ mortality, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Fires/ statistics & numerical data, Humans, Indians, North American/statistics & numerical data, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, United States/epidemiology
AbstractOBJECTIVE: We examined disparities in burn and fire injuries by age and race/ ethnicity to identify disparities during the life course. METHODS: Burn and fire mortality rates were disaggregated by five-year age groups, gender, and race/ethnicity from 1999 to 2004. RESULTS: Compared with non-Hispanic white people, Native American and African American people older than 55 years of age experienced a higher risk of death from fires and burns. The rate ratio of burn/fire deaths for African Americans compared with white people was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.98, 3.31) for those aged 55 years and older. The corresponding rate ratio for Native Americans compared with white people was 1.93 (95% CI 1.49, 2.46) for those aged 55 years and older. CONCLUSION: The especially heightened risk among minority seniors could reflect living arrangements that place them at higher risk. Heightened fire risks for minority seniors require broad attention and the development of effective interventions.
Short TitlePublic health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)
Ethno Med: