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Health behaviors, chronic disease prevalence and self-rated health of older Asian Indian immigrants in the U.S

TitleHealth behaviors, chronic disease prevalence and self-rated health of older Asian Indian immigrants in the U.S
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsJonnalagadda, SS, Diwan, S
JournalJ Immigr HealthJ Immigr Health
Volume7
Pagination75-83
Date PublishedApr
ISBN Number1096-4045 (Print)<br/>1096-4045 (Linking)
Accession Number15789159
KeywordsAcculturation, Age Distribution, Age Factors, Aged, Attitude to Health/ ethnology, Body Weight, Chronic Disease/ epidemiology, Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology, Exercise, Female, Health Behavior/ ethnology, Health Status, Humans, Hypertension/epidemiology, India/ethnology, Life Style, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Risk Factors, Social Support, United States/epidemiology
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the correlates of healthy behaviors and self-rated health in middle-aged and older Asian Indian immigrants in the U.S. Asian Indian men (n=162) and women (n=64), 50 years of age or older completed a telephone survey which collected information regarding demographics, behavioral risk factors, acculturation, perceived control, quality of social support, depression, body mass index, chronic disease prevalence, and self-rated health. Participants' average length of residence in the U.S. was 25 years, 52% were normal weight, 41% were vegetarians, 55% incorporated aerobic activity into daily lifestyle, and only 5% smoked. Hypertension and diabetes were most common chronic diseases (31 and 18%, respectively). Younger age, longer length of residence and a bicultural or more American ethnic identity were associated with greater participation in physical activity. Likewise, higher income, a bicultural or more American ethnic identity and depression were associated with higher fat intake. Poor self-rated health was associated with older age, female gender, BMI>25, satisfaction with social support, and greater number of chronic disease conditions. A multitude of factors influence the practice of healthy behaviors and the perceived health of Asian Indian immigrants, which should be addressed when developing culturally appropriate health promotion interventions.