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Habitual sugar intake and cognitive function among middle-aged and older Puerto Ricans without diabetes

TitleHabitual sugar intake and cognitive function among middle-aged and older Puerto Ricans without diabetes
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsYe, X, Gao, X, Scott, T, Tucker, KL
JournalBr J NutrBr J Nutr
Volume106
Pagination1423-32
Date PublishedNov
ISBN Number1475-2662 (Electronic)<br/>0007-1145 (Linking)
Accession Number21736803
KeywordsAged, Boston, Cognition Disorders/ etiology, Cognition/ drug effects, Diabetes Mellitus, Diet Records, Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage/ pharmacology, Food Habits, Fructose/ pharmacology, Humans, Learning/drug effects, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Puerto Rico/ethnology, Questionnaires, Sucrose/ pharmacology, Sweetening Agents/ pharmacology
AbstractIntake of added sugars, mainly fructose and sucrose, has been associated with risk factors for cognitive impairment, such as obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The objective of this analysis was to examine whether habitual intakes of total sugars, added sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages or sweetened solid foods are associated with cognitive function. The present study included 737 participants without diabetes, aged 45-75 years, from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, 2004-9. Cognitive function was measured with a battery of seven tests: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), word list learning, digit span, clock drawing, figure copying, and Stroop and verbal fluency tests. Usual dietary intake was assessed with a validated FFQ. Greater intakes of total sugars, added sugars and sugar-sweetened beverages, but not of sugar-sweetened solid foods, were significantly associated with lower MMSE score, after adjusting for covariates. Adjusted OR for cognitive impairment (MMSE score