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Financial exploitation and psychological mistreatment among older adults: Differences between African Americans and non-African Americans in a population-based survey

TitleFinancial exploitation and psychological mistreatment among older adults: Differences between African Americans and non-African Americans in a population-based survey
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsBeach, SR, Schulz, R, Castle, NG, Rosen, J
JournalThe GerontologistThe Gerontologist
Volume50
Pagination744-757
Date PublishedDec
ISBN Number0016-9013<br/>1758-5341
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2010-24898-003
Keywords*Aging, *Elder Abuse, *Emotional Abuse, *Finance, *Racial and Ethnic Differences, Behavior Disorders & Antisocial Behavior [3230], Blacks, financial exploitation, psychological mistreatment, older adults, African Americans, racial differences, Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older) Very Old (85 yrs & older), us
AbstractPurpose: To examine racial differences in (a) the prevalence of financial exploitation and psychological mistreatment since turning 60 and in the past 6 months and (b) the experience-perpetrator, frequency, and degree of upset-of psychological mistreatment in the past 6 months. Design and methods: Random digit dial telephone recruitment and population-based survey (telephone and in-person) of 903 adults aged 60 years and older in Allegheny County (Pittsburgh), Pennsylvania (693 non-African American and 210 African American). Covariates included sex, age, education, marital status, household composition, cognitive function, instrumental activities of daily living/activities of daily living difficulties, and depression symptoms. Results: Prevalence rates were significantly higher for African Americans than for non- African Americans for financial exploitation since turning 60 (23.0% vs. 8.4%) and in the past 6 months (12.9% vs. 2.4%) and for psychological mistreatment since turning 60 (24.4% vs. 13.2%) and in the past 6 months (16.1% vs. 7.2%). These differences remained once all covariates were controlled in logistic regression models. There were also racial differences in the experience of psychological mistreatment in the past 6 months. Risk for clinical depression was also a consistent predictor of financial exploitation and psychological mistreatment. Implications: Although the results will need to be replicated in national surveys, the study suggests that racial differences in elder mistreatment are a potentially serious issue deserving of continued attention from researchers, health providers, and social service professionals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
Ethno Med: