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The effect of art therapy on cognitive performance of Hispanic/Latino older adults [corrected] [published erratum appears in ART THER 2010;27(4):5]

TitleThe effect of art therapy on cognitive performance of Hispanic/Latino older adults [corrected] [published erratum appears in ART THER 2010;27(4):5]
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsAlders, A, Levine-Madori, L
JournalArt Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy AssociationArt Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association
Volume27
Pagination127-135
ISBN Number0742-1656
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and Over, Art Therapy -- In Old Age, Cognition -- Evaluation -- In Old Age, Cognition Disorders -- Prevention and Control -- In Old Age, Data Analysis Software, Descriptive Statistics, Educational Status, Female, Functional Status, Geriatric Functional Assessment, Hispanics -- In Old Age, Human, Immigrants, Internal Validity, Male, Middle Age, Neuropsychological Tests, New England, Outcome Assessment, Outpatients, P-Value, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient, Pilot Studies, Pretest-Posttest Design, Prospective Studies, Psychomotor Performance, Quasi-Experimental Studies, Questionnaires, Regression, Self Report, Sensitivity and Specificity, Test-Retest Reliability, Treatment Outcomes
AbstractThis article presents the results of a pilot study investigating the efficacy of art therapy to enhance cognitive performance in a sample of 24 elderly HispaniclLatino members of a community center who participated in a weekly structured thematic therapeutic arts program. A 12-week, quasiexperimental, pretest/posttest, nonrandomized, controlled design evaluated outcomes using the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ. Participants who attended the art therapy sessions outperformed those who did not on both cognitive evaluation tests. The findings suggest that the combination of self-initiated art making with art therapy session attendance may be most beneficial for enhancing a person's perception of cognitive ability, which in turn may positively affect overall cognitive performance.