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Do Japanese American women really have fewer hot flashes than European Americans? The Hilo Women's Health Study

TitleDo Japanese American women really have fewer hot flashes than European Americans? The Hilo Women's Health Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBrown, DE, Sievert, LL, Morrison, LA, Reza, AM, Mills, PS
JournalMenopause (10723714)Menopause (10723714)
Volume16
Pagination870-876
ISBN Number1072-3714
KeywordsAnalysis of Variance, Asians, Asians -- Education, Asians -- Statistics and Numerical Data, Attitude to Health -- Ethnology, Chi Square Test, Cross Sectional Studies, Ethnological Research, Female, Hawaii, Hot Flashes -- Diagnosis, Hot Flashes -- Ethnology, Human, Japan -- Ethnology, Linear Regression, Logistic Regression, Menopause, Menopause -- Physiology, Middle Age, Monitoring, Physiologic, Questionnaires, Skin Physiology, Surveys, Whites, Whites -- Education, Whites -- Statistics and Numerical Data
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Many studies have found a significantly lower frequency of reported hot flashes (HFs) in Japanese and Japanese American (JA) populations, leading to speculation about possible dietary, genetic, or cultural differences. These studies have relied on subjective reports of HFs. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to compare both reported and objective HFs measured by sternal and nuchal skin conductance among JA and European American (EA) women. METHODS: Two surveys of HF frequencies were carried out among women of either EA or JA ethnicity; aged 45 to 55 years; living in Hilo, Hawaii; and not using exogenous hormones. The first was a postal questionnaire (n = 325); the second was carried out during a clinical study of HFs (n = 134). Women in the second group underwent 24-hour ambulatory and 3-hour laboratory monitoring for objective HFs measured through skin conductance at sternal and nuchal sites. Subjective HFs were recorded on the monitor or in a diary. RESULTS: JAs were significantly less likely to report having had HFs in the previous 2 weeks compared with EAs (postal sample: JAs, 30.9%; EAs, 43.9%; chi(2) = 6.9, P
Ethno Med: