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Disability among older American Indians and Alaska Natives: disparities in prevalence, health-risk behaviors, obesity, and chronic conditions

TitleDisability among older American Indians and Alaska Natives: disparities in prevalence, health-risk behaviors, obesity, and chronic conditions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsOkoro, CA, Denny, CH, McGuire, LC, Balluz, LS, Goins, RT, Mokdad, AH
JournalEthn DisEthn Dis
Volume17
Pagination686-92
Date PublishedAutumn
ISBN Number1049-510X (Print)<br/>1049-510X (Linking)
Accession Number18072380
KeywordsAged, Alaska/epidemiology/ethnology, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Chronic Disease/epidemiology/ethnology, Disabled Persons/ statistics & numerical data, Female, Health Behavior/ ethnology, Humans, Indians, North American/ ethnology, Inuits/ ethnology, Life Style/ethnology, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/epidemiology/ethnology, Prevalence, Sentinel Surveillance, Sex Factors
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of disabilities among older American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) and compare these estimates with those of other major racial/ ethnic groups. To estimate, within the population with disabilities, the health-risk behaviors, obesity, and chronic conditions of older AIANs and compare them with estimates for other racial/ethnic groups. DESIGN: State-based surveillance system that collects data on a monthly basis using an independent probability sample of households with telephones among the noninstitutionalized population aged > or =18 years. METHODS: We analyzed data on 434,972 noninstitutionalized adults aged > or =50 years from the 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. RESULTS: Among older AIAN adults, the unadjusted prevalence of disability (38.4%) was higher than among Whites (29.7%), Blacks (33.5%), Asians (15.6%), and Hispanics (26.9%). Among older adults with disabilities, AIANs were younger than their counterparts in other groups and were as likely to be male as female. After adjustment for age and self-rated health, both AIAN men and women with disabilities had the highest prevalence of current smoking, heart disease, and asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to prevent, delay, and reduce disabilities and associated secondary conditions in persons with disabilities must be culturally sensitive and targeted toward reducing racial/ethnic disparities in health-risk behaviors and chronic conditions.
Ethno Med: