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Disability among older American Indians and Alaska Natives: an analysis of the 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Sample

TitleDisability among older American Indians and Alaska Natives: an analysis of the 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Sample
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsGoins, RT, Moss, M, Buchwald, D, Guralnik, JM
JournalGerontologistGerontologist
Volume47
Pagination690-6
Date PublishedOct
ISBN Number0016-9013 (Print)<br/>0016-9013 (Linking)
Accession Number17989411
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Alaska/epidemiology, Censuses, Disability Evaluation, Disabled Persons, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Indians, North American, Inuits, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, United States/epidemiology
AbstractPURPOSE: We compared the prevalence of disability among older American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with that among their African American and White peers, then examined sociodemographic characteristics associated with disability among AI/ANs. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed the 5% 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Sample. We assessed disability by functional limitation, mobility disability, and self-care disability for four age groups (55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years or older). RESULTS: For all age strata, AI/ANs reported the highest rates of functional limitation and African Americans the highest level of mobility disability. In the 55-to-64 age group, AI/ANs experienced the highest prevalence of self-care disability, and among those aged 65 years or older, African Americans reported the highest prevalence. Compared to Whites, the adjusted odds ratios for functional limitation, mobility disability, and self-care disability were significantly elevated in AI/ANs (1.62, 1.33, and 1.56, respectively) and African Americans (1.27, 1.54, and 1.56, respectively). For AI/ANs, being of increased age, being female, having lower educational attainment and household income, not being married or in the labor force, and residing in a metropolitan area were associated with disabilities. IMPLICATIONS: This study contributes to researchers' limited knowledge regarding disability among older AI/ANs. The lack of available empirical data poses obstacles to understanding the antecedents and consequences of disability for AI/ANs. More information on the nature and extent of disabilities among AI/AN elders would enhance the ability of advocates to document their needs and raise public awareness. Likewise, policy makers could enact prevention strategies and make comprehensive rehabilitative and long-term care services available to this population.
Ethno Med: