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Death rates from human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis among American Indians/Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990-2009

TitleDeath rates from human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis among American Indians/Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990-2009
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsReilley, B, Bloss, E, Byrd, KK, Iralu, J, Neel, L, Cheek, J
JournalAm J Public HealthAm J Public Health
Volume104 Suppl 3
PaginationS453-9
Date PublishedJun
ISBN Number1541-0048 (Electronic)<br/>0090-0036 (Linking)
Accession Number24754664
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Alaska/epidemiology/ethnology, Cause of Death, Child, Child, Preschool, Death Certificates, European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data, Female, HIV Infections/ ethnology/ mortality, Humans, Indians, North American/ statistics & numerical data, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Inuits/ statistics & numerical data, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Registries, Tuberculosis/ ethnology/ mortality, United States/epidemiology
AbstractOBJECTIVES: We used race-corrected data and comprehensive diagnostic codes to better compare HIV and tuberculosis (TB) mortality from 1999 to 2009 between American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and Whites. METHODS: National Vital Statistics Surveillance System mortality data were adjusted for AI/AN racial misclassification through linkage with Indian Health Service registration records. We compared average annual 1990 to 2009 HIV and TB death rates (per 100,000 people) for AI/AN persons with those for Whites; Hispanics were excluded. RESULTS: Although death rates from HIV in AI/AN persons were significantly lower than those in Whites from 1990 to 1998 (4.2 vs 7.0), they were significantly higher than those in Whites from 1999 to 2009 (3.6 vs 2.0). Death rates from TB in AI/AN persons were significantly higher than those in Whites, with a significant disparity during both 1990 to 1998 (3.3 vs 0.3) and 1999 to 2009 (1.5 vs 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in death rates from HIV and TB was greater among Whites, and death rates remained significantly higher among AI/AN individuals. Public health interventions need to be prioritized to reduce the TB and HIV burden and mortality in AI/AN populations.
Ethno Med: