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Coping with breast cancer at the nexus of religiosity and Hawaiian culture: perspectives of native Hawaiian survivors and family members

TitleCoping with breast cancer at the nexus of religiosity and Hawaiian culture: perspectives of native Hawaiian survivors and family members
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsKa'opua, LSI, Mitschke, DB, Kloezeman, KC
JournalJournal of Religion & Spirituality in Social WorkJournal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work
Volume27
Pagination275-295
ISBN Number1542-6432
KeywordsAborigines, Aged, Audiorecording, Breast Neoplasms -- Psychosocial Factors, Cancer Survivors -- Psychosocial Factors -- Hawaii, Coding, Coping, Culture, Family, Female, Funding Source, Hawaii, Health Services -- Utilization, Human, Male, Middle Age, Narratives, Phenomenological Research, Purposive Sample, Religion and Religions, Semi-Structured Interview, Spirituality
AbstractThis article describes research to develop a breast health intervention for women in Hawaiian churches. Native Hawaiian women are disproportionately burdened by breast disease and tend to be diagnosed at advanced stages when treatment options are more limited. Research suggests that cultural conflict may be a factor in Hawaiian women's underutilization of conventional health services. Phenomenological approaches guided data collection and analysis to explore the influence of religiosity and ethnocultural tradition in coping with breast cancer. The overarching theme was kakou (we or us), which emphasized ways of coping oriented to the family collective and focused on family well-being. Findings offer a portal for understanding the lived experience of survivors and families in Hawaiian churches. Considerations are suggested for those practitioners assisting clients from collectivist-oriented cultures.