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Contralateral distribution of nonmelanoma skin cancer between older Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic/non-Latino individuals

TitleContralateral distribution of nonmelanoma skin cancer between older Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic/non-Latino individuals
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMcLeod, MP, Ferris, KM, Choudhary, S, Alqubaisy, Y, Shiman, M, Loring-Warsch, J, Mlacker, S, Jawitz, S, Perez, A, Nouri, K
JournalBr J DermatolBr J Dermatol
Volume168
Pagination65-73
Date PublishedJan
ISBN Number1365-2133 (Electronic)<br/>0007-0963 (Linking)
Accession Number22897506
KeywordsAdult, Age Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Carcinoma, Basal Cell/ethnology/ pathology, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/ethnology/ pathology, Cohort Studies, Female, Florida/epidemiology, Head and Neck Neoplasms/ethnology/pathology, Hispanic Americans/ethnology, Humans, Lower Extremity, Male, Middle Aged, Sex Distribution, Skin Neoplasms/ethnology/ pathology, Torso, Upper Extremity, Young Adult
AbstractBACKGROUND: A recent review of the SEER database revealed that melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma occur more commonly on the left side of the body. Similarly, a trend was reported in which nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) were found to be distributed more frequently on the left side of the body. OBJECTIVES: To compare the sidedness of NMSC in a large patient population. There were five primary objectives of the present study: (i) to confirm or refute the left-sided trend of NMSC in the largest patient population studied for asymmetry to date; (ii) to determine whether the left-sided trend existed in Hispanic/Latino individuals; (iii) to examine skin cancer in older individuals across ethnicities; (iv) to compare distribution across anatomical location and ethnicity; and (v) to measure gender differences in the distribution of NMSC. METHODS: The last 3026 cases referred to the Mohs surgical unit at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine during 2008-2011 were reviewed. The patient's age, gender, tumour side, tumour type, anatomical location and ethnicity were recorded. RESULTS: There were 1505 (50.2%) right-sided tumours and 1495 (49.8%) left-sided tumours (P=0.52). The Hispanic/Latino group had a nonsignificant right-sided trend with 607 (52.7%) right-sided cases and 545 (47.3%) left-sided cases (P=0.06). The non-Hispanic/non-Latino group between the ages of 60 and 85 years had 605 (46.9%) right-sided tumours and 686 (53.1%) left-sided tumours (P=0.024). The Hispanic/Latino group between the ages of 60 and 85 years demonstrated 404 (54.0%) right-sided tumours and 344 (46.0%) left-sided tumours (P=0.028). One hundred and fifty-four skin cancers were located on the upper extremities of non-Hispanic/non-Latino individuals with 64 (41.6%) being right sided and 90 (58.4%) left sided (P=0.036). Seventy-eight skin cancers were located on the upper extremities of Hispanic/Latino individuals with 49 (62.8%) being right sided and 29 (37.2%) left sided (P=0.024). Males had most of the skin cancers at 2125 (70.8%) cases and females had 875 (29.2%) cases (P