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The Concept of “Silencing the Self” in Low-Income, Aging, HIV-Infected African American Women: A 10-Year Community-Based Participatory Program of Research With Results

TitleThe Concept of “Silencing the Self” in Low-Income, Aging, HIV-Infected African American Women: A 10-Year Community-Based Participatory Program of Research With Results
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsDeMarco, RF, Lanier, LR
JournalJANAC: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS CareJANAC: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume25
Pagination112-122
ISBN Number1055-3290
KeywordsAction Research, Blacks, Depression, Female, Funding Source, Health Behavior, HIV Infections, HIV Infections -- Prevention and Control, Human, Massachusetts, Models, Theoretical, Motion Pictures, Professional Practice, Evidence-Based, Prospective Studies, Self Concept, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Support Groups, Writing
AbstractDespite a resilient spirit, the challenges that face low-income, aging Black women living with HIV infection are immense. This article describes a 10-year iterative history of using the Theory of Silencing the Self (TSTS) as an explanatory model that was found to be gender sensitive, culturally relevant, and helpful in guiding a community-based participatory research group of low-income, HIV-infected Black women living in Boston, Massachusetts. The group, called Sistah Powah, used the TSTS to design and implement a structured writing intervention in a women's drop-in center targeting low-income, aging Black women living with HIV infection as a way to give them and others a voice.
Ethno Med: