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A comparison of colorectal cancer screening uptake among average-risk insured American Indian/Alaska Native and white women

TitleA comparison of colorectal cancer screening uptake among average-risk insured American Indian/Alaska Native and white women
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsPerdue, DG, Chubak, J, Bogart, A, Dillard, DA, Garroutte, EM, Buchwald, D
JournalJ Health Care Poor UnderservedJ Health Care Poor Underserved
Volume24
Pagination1125-35
Date PublishedAug
ISBN Number1548-6869 (Electronic)<br/>1049-2089 (Linking)
Accession Number23974386
KeywordsAlaska/ethnology, Colorectal Neoplasms/ ethnology/ prevention & control, Databases, Factual, European Continental Ancestry Group/ statistics & numerical data, Female, Humans, Indians, North American/ statistics & numerical data, Mass Screening/ utilization, Middle Aged, Northwestern United States, Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ ethnology/statistics & numerical data
AbstractINTRODUCTION: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have among the lowest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Whether screening disparities persist with equal access to health care is unknown. METHODS: Using administrative data from 1996-2007, we compared CRC screening events for 286 AI/AN and 14,042 White women aged 50 years and older from a health maintenance organization in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. RESULTS: The proportion of AI/AN and White women screened for CRC at age 50 was similar (13.3% vs. 14.0%, p =.74). No differences were seen in the type of screening test. Time elapsed to first screening among AI/AN women who were not screened at age 50 did not differ from White women (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.8-1.3). CONCLUSIONS: Uptake for CRC screening was similar among insured AI/AN and White women, suggesting that when access to care is equal, racial disparities in screening diminish.
Ethno Med: