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Chronic pain management by ethnically and racially diverse older adults: pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain therapies

TitleChronic pain management by ethnically and racially diverse older adults: pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain therapies
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsPark, J, Manotas, K, Hooyman, N
JournalPain ManagPain Manag
Volume3
Pagination435-54
Date PublishedNov
ISBN Number1758-1877 (Electronic)<br/>1758-1869 (Linking)
Accession Number24654899
AbstractSUMMARY AIMS: Exploration of racial and ethnic group differences in noncancer chronic pain management in older adults. Participants & methods: Qualitative data, which were collected in semistructured face-to-face interviews with 44 racially and ethnically diverse community-dwelling older adults (ten African-Americans, ten Hispanics, 12 Afro-Caribbeans and 12 non-Hispanic whites), were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. RESULTS: The three racial and ethnic minority groups were more likely to use culturally based treatments (e.g., herbal tea and avocado leaves), home remedies and folk medicine, and/or psychological therapies (e.g., distraction and relaxation) than non-Hispanic whites to manage chronic pain. African-Americans relied on religious coping methods. Non-Hispanic whites were more likely to use physical interventions such as massage and chiropractic treatment. CONCLUSION: Study findings suggest differences by ethnicity in preferred pain interventions for an older adult population.