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Caregiving burden, acculturation, familism, and Mexican American elders' use of home care services

TitleCaregiving burden, acculturation, familism, and Mexican American elders' use of home care services
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsCrist, JD, McEwen, MMorris, Herrera, AP, Kim, S-S, Pasvogel, A, Hepworth, JT
JournalResearch and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International JournalResearch and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International Journal
Volume23
Pagination165-180
ISBN Number1541-6577
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2011-09456-002
Keywords*Acculturation, *Caregiver Burden, *Geriatrics, *Home Care, caregiver burden, acculturation, Mexican Americans, elders' usage, home care services, Home Care & Hospice [3375], Human Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older), Mexican Americans, us
AbstractCaregiving burden has been shown to predict use of home care services among Anglo Americans. In a previous study, only one of two dimensions of caregiving burden predicted such use among Mexican American caregivers. Because acculturation and familism may affect burden, we conducted analyses to test three hypotheses: increased acculturation decreases familism; decreased familism increases burden; and increased burden increases use of home care services. Among 140 Mexican American family caregivers, acculturation was positively correlated with familism; familism was not significantly correlated with burden; objective burden was positively correlated with use of home care services, and objective and subjective burden significantly interacted in their effect on the use of home care services. Targeted interventions may be needed to increase use of home care services and preserve the well-being of Mexican American elders and caregivers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).