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Better glycemic control is associated with maintenance of lower-extremity function over time in Mexican American and European American older adults with diabetes

TitleBetter glycemic control is associated with maintenance of lower-extremity function over time in Mexican American and European American older adults with diabetes
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsWang, CP, Hazuda, HP
JournalDiabetes CareDiabetes Care
Volume34
Pagination268-73
Date PublishedFeb
ISBN Number1935-5548 (Electronic)<br/>0149-5992 (Linking)
Accession Number21216857
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Aging, Diabetes Complications/drug therapy/ ethnology, Disability Evaluation, European Continental Ancestry Group/ statistics & numerical data, Female, Humans, Hyperglycemia/drug therapy/ ethnology, Incidence, Leg, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mexican Americans/ statistics & numerical data, Mobility Limitation, Motor Activity, Prevalence
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a major cause of functional decline among older adults, but the role of glycemic control remains unclear. This article assesses whether better glycemic control is associated with better maintenance of lower-extremity function over time in older adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants (n = 119) in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging, ages 71-85, who met American Diabetes Association diabetes criteria were followed over a 36-month period. Seven measures of A1C (HbA(1c)) were obtained at 6-month intervals; three measures of lower-extremity function were obtained at 18-month intervals using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). A two-step analytic approach was used, first, to identify distinct glycemic control classes using latent growth mixture modeling and, second, to examine trajectories of lower-extremity function based on these classes using path analysis. RESULTS: Two glycemic control classes were identified: a poorer control class with higher means (all >7%) and higher within-subject variability in HbA(1c) and a better control class with lower means (all