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Barriers to completion of advance care directives among African Americans ages 25-84: a cross-generational study

TitleBarriers to completion of advance care directives among African Americans ages 25-84: a cross-generational study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsWest, SK, Hollis, M
JournalOmega (Westport)Omega (Westport)
Volume65
Pagination125-37
ISBN Number0030-2228 (Print)<br/>0030-2228 (Linking)
Accession Number22953509
KeywordsAdult, Advance Directives/ ethnology, African Americans/ psychology, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Attitude to Death/ ethnology, Attitude to Health/ ethnology, Communication Barriers, Cultural Characteristics, Female, Health Promotion/organization & administration, Humans, Intergenerational Relations/ ethnology, Male, Middle Aged, North Carolina, Questionnaires, Trust
AbstractPrior studies conducted in the area of Advance Care Directive document completion in African Americans have primarily targeted the elderly who are either institutionalized in skilled nursing facilities or are members of faith communities. Few studies have been done concerning barriers to Advance Care Directive document completion that include non-elderly African Americans. The purpose of this study was to identify the common barriers to advance care directive document completion across generations of African Americans ages 25-84. Using convenience sampling among various Baptist denominations of the African-American faith community of Buncombe County, North Carolina, 40 individuals ranging in age from 25-84 participated in multiple focus group sessions. Findings revealed participants shared three common barriers: 1) surrogate decision-making, 2) lack of education concerning advance care directive discussions and completion, and 3) fear and denial. Also revealed were barriers that varied across generations: 1) fatalism, 2) mistrust of the health care system, 3) spirituality, and 4) economics.
Short TitleOmega
Ethno Med: