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Barriers and facilitators to walking and physical activity among American Indian elders

TitleBarriers and facilitators to walking and physical activity among American Indian elders
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsSawchuk, CN, Russo, JE, Bogart, A, Charles, S, Goldberg, J, Forquera, R, Roy-Byrne, P, Buchwald, D
JournalPrev Chronic DisPrev Chronic Dis
Volume8
PaginationA63
Date PublishedMay
ISBN Number1545-1151 (Electronic)
Accession Number21477503
KeywordsAged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise/ physiology, Female, Health Promotion, Health Services Accessibility, Health Services Research, Humans, Indians, North American, Male, Middle Aged, Quality of Life, Urban Population, Walking/ physiology, Washington
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Physical inactivity is common among older American Indians. Several barriers impede the establishment and maintenance of routine exercise. We examined personal and built-environment barriers and facilitators to walking and physical activity and their relationship with health-related quality of life in American Indian elders. METHODS: We used descriptive statistics to report barriers and facilitators to walking and physical activity among a sample of 75 American Indians aged 50 to 74 years. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between health-related quality of life and barriers to walking and physical activity after adjusting for caloric expenditure and total frequency of all exercise activities. RESULTS: Lack of willpower was the most commonly reported barrier. Elders were more likely to report personal as opposed to built-environment reasons for physical inactivity. Better health and being closer to interesting places were common walking facilitators. Health-related quality of life was inversely related to physical activity barriers, and poor mental health quality of life was more strongly associated with total barriers than poor physical health. CONCLUSION: We identified a variety of barriers and facilitators that may influence walking and physical activity among American Indian elders. More research is needed to determine if interventions to reduce barriers and promote facilitators can lead to objective, functional health outcomes.
Ethno Med: