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Associations between social relationships and emotional well-being in middle-aged and older African Americans

TitleAssociations between social relationships and emotional well-being in middle-aged and older African Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsWarren-Findlow, J, Laditka, JN, Laditka, SB, Thompson, ME
JournalResearch on AgingResearch on Aging
Volume33
Pagination713-734
Date PublishedNov
ISBN Number0164-0275
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2011-22596-005
Keywords*Aging, *Blacks, *Emotional States, *Well Being, Developmental Psychology [2800], Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Thirties (30-39 yrs) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older) Very Old (85 yrs & older), social relationships, emotional well being, middle aged African Americans, older African Americans, us
AbstractSocial relationships may enhance emotional health in older age. The authors examined associations between social relationships and emotional health using data from the Milwaukee African American sample of the second Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS II) study, 2005-2006 (n = 592). Self-reports indicated good, very good, or excellent emotional health, distinguished from fair or poor. Social relationships were measured by relationship type (family or friend), contact frequency, and levels of emotional support and strain. Control variables included demographic characteristics, types of lifetime and daily discrimination, neighborhood quality, and other social factors. In adjusted results, each increase on a family emotional support scale was associated with 118% greater odds of reporting better emotional health (odds ratio [OR] = 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.43, 3.32]). Friend emotional support also was associated with better emotional health (OR = 1.59, CI [1.07, 2.34]). Daily discrimination substantially reduced reported emotional health; family and friend support buffered this effect. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
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