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Association between cognitive activity and cognitive function in older Hispanics

TitleAssociation between cognitive activity and cognitive function in older Hispanics
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsMarquine, MJ, Segawa, E, Wilson, RS, Bennett, DA, Barnes, LL
JournalJ Int Neuropsychol SocJ Int Neuropsychol Soc
Volume18
Pagination1041-51
Date PublishedNov
ISBN Number1469-7661 (Electronic)<br/>1355-6177 (Linking)
Accession Number22676914
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and Over, Aging, Child, Cognition/ethics/ physiology, Cohort Studies, Dementia/diagnosis/ physiopathology, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Geriatric Assessment, Hispanic Americans/psychology, Humans, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Psychometrics, Reproducibility of Results, Statistics, Nonparametric, Young Adult
AbstractThere is limited research on the association between participation in cognitively stimulating activity and cognitive function in older Hispanics. The main purpose of the present study was to explore whether frequency of cognitive activity and its association with cognitive function in Hispanics is comparable to that of non-Hispanics. In a multiethnic cohort of 1571 non-demented older adults, we assessed past and current cognitive activity, availability of cognitive resources in the home in childhood and middle age, and five domains of cognitive function. The measures of cognitive activity and cognitive resources had adequate reliability and validity in our subset of Hispanic participants (n = 81). Hispanics reported lower levels of education, lower frequency of cognitive activity and less cognitive resources than non-Hispanic White (n = 1102) and non-Hispanic Black (n = 388) participants. Despite these differences the strength of the association between cognitive activity and cognitive function was comparable across ethnic groups. Because Hispanics have lower frequency of cognitive activity, the benefit of cognitive activity to late life cognitive function may be potentially larger in this segment of the population. Thus, interventions aimed at increasing frequency of participation in cognitively stimulating activity may offer a potential target to reduce cognitive impairment in Hispanics.