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Aging and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in older American Indians: The Strong Heart Study

TitleAging and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in older American Indians: The Strong Heart Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsRhoades, DA, Welty, TK, Wang, W, Yeh, F, Devereux, RB, Fabsitz, RR, Lee, ET, Howard, BV
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics SocietyJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume55
Pagination87-94
Date PublishedJan
ISBN Number0002-8614<br/>1532-5415
Accession NumberPeer Reviewed Journal: 2007-00019-011
Keywords*Aging, *American Indians, *Cardiovascular Disorders, *Epidemiology, *Risk Factors, aging, prevalence, cardiovascular disease, risk factors, older American Indians, Gerontology [2860], Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) Aged (65 yrs & older), us
AbstractObjectives: To describe longitudinal changes in the prevalence of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in aging American Indians. Design: Population-based ongoing epidemiological study. Setting: The Strong Heart Study is a study of CVD and its risk factors. Standardized examinations were repeated in 1993 to 1995 and again in 1997 to 1999. Participants: A diverse cohort of 4,549 American Indians aged 45 to 74 at the initial examinations in 1989 to 1991. Measurements: Changes in the prevalence of hypertension, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), current smoking, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: The prevalence of hypertension rose rapidly and steadily with aging. A nonsignificant decrease in LDLC was seen in men, and men and women initially had rapid increases in the prevalence of low HDL-C. The prevalence of smoking decreased, but the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continued to rise for men and women. Conclusion: Overall, unfavorable changes in CVD risk factors were seen in the aging participants and will likely be reflected in worsening morbidity and mortality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).
Ethno Med: