Skip to content Skip to navigation

A1C and diabetes diagnosis among Filipino Americans, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians

TitleA1C and diabetes diagnosis among Filipino Americans, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsAraneta, MR, Grandinetti, A, Chang, HK
JournalDiabetes CareDiabetes Care
Volume33
Pagination2626-8
Date PublishedDec
ISBN Number1935-5548 (Electronic)<br/>0149-5992 (Linking)
Accession Number20833866
KeywordsAsian Americans, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/ diagnosis/ epidemiology/metabolism, Female, Glucose Tolerance Test, Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated/ metabolism, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Oceanic Ancestry Group
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To examine the sensitivity and specificity of A1C >/= 6.5% to diagnose diabetes among Filipino Americans, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study among middle-aged adults without prior diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who completed a 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and A1C measures. RESULTS: The 933 participants had a mean age of 54.2 years, and 73% were women. A total of 425 (45.5%) subjects had impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance, 145 (15.5%) had type 2 diabetes (by OGTT), and 83 (8.9%) had A1C >/= 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of A1C >/= 6.5% to define diabetes (by OGTT) was 40.0 and 96.8% and 68.9 and 95.3%, respectively (by fasting plasma glucose only). However, (64.8%) of Filipino and Japanese subjects with diabetes had isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia; AIC >/= 6.5% sensitivity and specificity was 19.1 and 92.1%, respectively, to define isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia in the total sample. CONCLUSIONS: A1C >/= 6.5% had low sensitivity and may delay diagnosis of type 2 diabetes without OGTT. This limitation is exacerbated by isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia in Asian Americans.